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TN DEER SEASON 2017-18

By Steve McCadams


YOUTH DEER HUNT

The first of two Tennessee young sportsman deer hunts for the 2017-18 season will be held the weekend of Oct. 28-29.

Youth ages 6-16 years of age may participate. Participating youth can use gun, muzzleloader, and archery equipment.

Young sportsmen must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult, 21 or older who must remain in position to take immediate control of the hunting device. The adult must also comply with the fluorescent orange regulations as specified for legal hunters. Multiple youth may be accompanied by a single qualifying adult.

Archery season began in the state on Sept. 23 and the first segment ends Oct. 27, the day prior to the opening of the young sportsman hunt. The second segment of archery only season begins Monday, Oct. 30 through Friday, Nov. 3.

The TWRA makes the recommendation that all hunters obtain a 2017-18 Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide. The guide lists license requirements, the counties and bag limits for each of the different deer management units. The guides are available where hunting and fishing licenses are sold and on the TWRA website, www.tnwildlife.org.

In 2016, youth hunters harvested a total of 5,854 deer during the first hunt. All 95 Tennessee counties reported harvests in 2016.
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BOW SEASON RETURNS…DEER HUNTERS READY FOR NEW YEAR


The fourth Saturday in September in the traditional opening day for deer season in Tennessee. Each year the archery season kicks off the state’s deer season, which offers several different segments for bow hunters, regular gun and blackpowder style hunters.

Looks like it’s going to be a warm one too! Like anglers the legion of bow hunters heading to the woods and climbing a tree into their deer stand wishes temps were a bit cooler.

A cool brisk morning just sort of improves the overall atmosphere. Makes it feel more like hunting season. A hot a humid outing just takes something out of the pizzazz of the moment.

Hunters had rather be sporting a light jacket and zipping it up to the collar than swatting mosquitos or dodging gnats.

Those fortunate enough to harvest a deer best get it to a processor and cooling chamber pretty quick too. In this weather deer meat could spoil rather quickly.

The 2017 deer archery-only hunting season opens statewide in Tennessee on Saturday. The archery season dates in all five of the state’s deer hunting units are the same. The dates are Sept. 23-Oct. 27 and Oct. 30-Nov. 3.

Tennessee is divided into five deer units for better management, A, B, C, D, and L. The antlerless deer bag limits are four in Units A-D management areas and three per day in Unit L areas. The antlered deer bag limit is a total of two for the entire deer season.

In addition to deer, archers may harvest wild turkeys of either sex during the archery-only deer season in counties that have a fall turkey hunt. Turkeys harvested during the archery-only deer season count toward the fall turkey county bag limits.

For details on the various segments of deer season and specific rules log onto www.tnwildlife.org.

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ON-LINE HARVEST INSTRUCTIONS

    The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency provides several methods for hunters to report their big game harvests. Recently some hunters have reported problems when using their personal computer to report a harvest. TWRA is offering the following instructions for those persons experiencing time-out issues when accessing the TWRA’s online harvest reporting system.

    In most cases, the issues are connected to the internet browser on your computer and can be resolved by following the steps below. (The specific instructions are based on Internet Explorer because it is the State of Tennessee standard). However, if a different browser is utilized such as Firefox or Chrome, the persons will need to accomplish the same task, but will need to refer to specific instructions posted on those manufacturer websites.

1)  Select "Tools"

2)   Select "Internet Options"

3)   Delete all cookies and temporary internet files

4)   Open a new browser tab and manually type in GOTWRA.ORG (do not use the saved link from a previous session)

    Sportsmen are reminded that big game harvests can also be checked in on the TWRA mobile app from a smart phone or tablet and in person at a traditional check station.
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HENRY COUNTY THIRD STATEWIDE IN DEER HARVEST 2016-17

Tennessee’s deer season ended last Sunday when the last of two special youth hunts saw the curtain fall. Overall it was a pretty successful season for local hunters and those statewide as well.

Unofficial total from Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency stood at 157,227 for the year. Locally, hunters in Henry County checked in 3,823 since the archery season opened back on the fourth Saturday in September.

Henry County’s total ranked third in the statewide harvest among the state’s ninety-five counties.

Top county for the year in Tennessee was Fayette where hunters harvested 4,233 deer. Second place went to Giles County as hunters there checked in 3,925.

One of the highlights of the season was a buck harvested in Sumner County during the a muzzleloader season, has completed a step toward becoming a world record for a non-typical deer rack.

Boone and Crockett officials spent several hours on January 9 scoring the 47-point buck tabbed the “Tennessee Tucker Buck” as the Nashville headquarters of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. The buck was harvested by 26-year old Gallatin resident Stephen Tucker.

The deer rack scored 312 3/8 in the Boone and Crockett tabulation. The tabulation was held after 60 days had passed since the original “wet” score indicated that the buck was a potential world record. As it stands, the score will break previous mark of 307 5/8.

Here’s hoping you had a good season even if you didn’t take a trophy buck!

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HENRY SECOND IN STATEWIDE DEER HARVEST 2015-2016

The Volunteer State’s deer season came to an end last Sunday with the culmination of the final weekend youth deer hunt where kids ages 6-16 had the last shot.

According to unofficial figures from Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency the statewide deer harvest stands at 167,240 for the 2015-2016 season total.

Henry County deer hunters had another good year and were leading the state’s 95 counties for a few weeks in the latter part of the season but lost the top spot ranking to Giles County by only 116. Hunters here checked in 4,616 but Giles was tops with 4,732.

Neighboring counties had the following totals for the year: Benton 2,228; Carroll 3,334; Stewart 3,043; Weakley 2,956.


NATIONAL HUNT/FISH DAY

Over 100 years ago, hunters and anglers were the earliest and most vocal supporters of conservation and scientific wildlife management. They were the first to recognize that rapid development and unregulated uses of wildlife were threatening the future of many species.

Led by fellow sportsman President Theodore Roosevelt, these early conservationists called for the first laws restricting the commercial slaughter of wildlife. They urged sustainable use of fish and game, created hunting and fishing licenses, and lobbied for taxes on sporting equipment to provide funds for state conservation agencies. These actions were the foundation of the North American wildlife conservation model, a science-based, user-pay system that would foster the most dramatic conservation successes of all time.

Populations of white-tailed deer, elk, antelope, wild turkey, wood ducks and many other species began to recover from decades of unregulated exploitation.

During the next half-century, in addition to the funds they contributed for conservation and their diligent watch over the returning health of America’s outdoors, sportsmen worked countless hours to protect and improve millions of acres of vital habitat—lands and waters for the use and enjoyment of everyone.

In the 1960s, hunters and anglers embraced the era's heightened environmental awareness but were discouraged that many people didn't understand the crucial role that sportsmen had played-and continue to play-in the conservation movement.

On May 2, 1972, President Nixon signed the first proclamation of National Hunting and Fishing Day, writing, "I urge all citizens to join with outdoor sportsmen in the wise use of our natural resources and in insuring their proper management for the benefit of future generations."

By late summer, all 50 governors and over 600 mayors had joined in by proclaiming state and local versions of National Hunting and Fishing Day. The response was dramatic.

National, regional, state and local organizations staged some 3,000 "open house" hunting- and fishing-related events everywhere from shooting ranges to suburban frog ponds, providing an estimated four million Americans with a chance to experience, understand and appreciate traditional outdoor sports.

Over the years, National Hunting and Fishing Day boasted many more public relations successes, assisted by celebrities who volunteered to help spotlight the conservation accomplishments of sportsmen and women. Honorary chairs have included George Bush, Tom Seaver, Hank Williams Jr., Arnold Palmer, Terry Bradshaw, George Brett, Robert Urich, Ward Burton, Louise Mandrell, Travis Tritt, Tracy Byrd, Jeff Foxworthy and many other sports and entertainment figures.

National Hunting and Fishing Day, celebrated the fourth Saturday of every September, remains the most effective grassroots efforts ever undertaken to promote the outdoor sports and conservation.

 


Steve McCadams is a professional hunting and fishing guide here in the Paris Landing area. He has also contributed many outdoor oriented articles to various national publications.

 

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